May 10, 2007

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Spiderman 3: Music from and Inspired By [Soundtrack]
Record Collection Records, 2007

If I heard correctly, this movie cost half a billion dollars to make, thus the fact that the soundtrack was meticulously calculated for indisputable credibility shouldn’t boggle the mind. Unlike the Fantastic 4 soundtrack, which tried to drown out the collective performance of the “film’s” droolingly stupid cast through the use of poopy-diapers mall-metal claptrap, Spidey 3’s tunes attempt to underscore the awkwardness and vulnerability of the character by giving big-league love to college-radio superheroes in the midst of their own — how synchronistic, dude — “struggles.” In other words, no metal. Whole lotta faux-nervous alt-rock, though, beginning with the vastly overrated Snow Patrol auditioning to become the next Five For Fighting, grunge tangents notwithstanding, on “Signal Fire.” Later come the Killers and Yeah Yeah Yeahs with slight variations on their respective post-U2 and post-riot-grrl methodologies, Flaming Lips furthering their descent into does-anyone-actually-enjoy-this-stuff territory, and so forth. Jet fires off the real shocker in “Falling Star,” disguising themselves as Black Crowes, not that they aren’t headed there anyway. In “Red River,” The Walkmen, fresh from remaking the entire Harry Nilsson/John Lennon Pussy Cats album for whatever reason, imitate Bob Dylan fronting Wolfmother, who in turn take their zillionth oafish lunge at Zep’s “Custard Pie” here in “Pleased to Meet You.” C+Eric W. Saeger