October 26, 2006

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Some Action, The Band That Sucked the Life Out of Rock N Roll and Killed Itself in the Process
Gigantic Records, 2006

If native New Hampshirite Ethan Campbell hadn’t ever hatted out for the Big Apple he might never have found three kindred animate objects to encourage his New York Dolls fanboymania. Perhaps he’d still be here, taken to weekend-warrioring at the rock bars and glumly hating the rap thing like anyone else who’s secretly afraid that it’s a labyrinthine conspiracy somehow beyond the grasp of upright citizens. But what’s done is done, and whatever becomes of this album, it was a Good Thing, not simply because there’s a clause in the critics’ code that prescribes physical torture for wags who don’t speak well of the Dolls, although there’s still no conscientious way to talk smack about them that doesn’t boil down to complaints about their toilet-quality production. Will this be a huge record? No, it’s too messy, loud, old-school and good for that. Will those rotten Pitchforkers dig it? Probably not unless Some Action is able to infiltrate the Bowery Ballroom clusterprocreation and the guys can stomach hanging around all those big little-people for more than one beer, in which case all long-term bets would be off. While all this is going on, you can add to the confusion by downloading album opener “Live and Learn” and basking in precisely the sound Johnny Thunders would make if he’d been born in 1980. B+

— Eric W. Saeger