October 25, 2007

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DJ? Acucrack, Humanoids From the Deep
Cracknation Records, Oct. 2
From an Internet music board:

Q: How do you know drum n bass sucks?

A: It requires an emcee.

Now that’s harsh, and a bit under-analytical, not that the argument couldn’t be made that DnB is going to die the minute all the b-boys get fat and everyone else starts hating Dance Dance Revolution. This Chicago duo fronts Acumen Nation, the single heaviest industrial band on the planet, bar none, download and thank me later, but their vitriol is unquenchable, hence this tech-step project with its horror-flick store-front. They’ve been in the DnB game for going on eight years now, aiming to make the genre more accessible to newcomers by adding actual vocal lines and cleverly knitted samples (“Terror Train” utilizes the three frantic brass notes from Creature of the Black Lagoon, “Abomination” the Martian warning siren from War of the Worlds). Plenty of Dieselboy-esque moments, but Humanoids isn’t all hyper-super-speed breakbeats and random circuit-squelches at all; “Destroy All Robots” is a reflection on the duo’s time spent touring with KMFDM, and “Iced Aces” stumps for the intelligent-dance-music vote.

My honest opinion? I’d take no pleasure in being inundated with reams of Ed Rush-ripoff CDs raining from the skies, but this one’s gotten a few off-the-clock listens. (Point of order for the curious: the question mark after the “DJ” in their name signifies that they spin their own material and are not DJs in the classic sense.) A Eric W. Saeger